5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Morning! It’s Wednesday and we’re halfway there. Here’s what’s going on.

1. Google is dominating the cloud. But the tech giant realises it has a lot to learn from watching how people use technology in production. They’re pleased the rest of the industry is catching up but aren’t worried about losing business. Find out why here.

2. eWay ramps up its partnership with Shopify. As part of the integration the Aussie payment platform’s merchants get access to enterprise level fraud protection, token payments for easier repeat purchasing and eWAY’s “PreAuth” feature which allows merchants to reserve funds on a customer’s credit card without charging it. There’s more here.

3. A watch that calls the cops is tops. An Australian technology company has designed a watch that alerts emergency services at the press of a button. There’s also an on-call chaperon to escort you to your car at night. More here.

4. This tech CEO and his employees work just 32 hours each week. Ryan Carson tried the relentless startup lifestyle — it didn’t work. He was frustrated with his output and has cut his and his team’s workweek to just four days. More on that here.

5. Bringing light to the dark web. Users aren’t supposed to be able to access dark web sites unless their traffic is anonymised. The IP addresses of dark web services are also hidden so that their hosts are not able to be tracked — or at least that’s how it’s supposed to work. But this researcher has been uncovering IP addresses. Find out how here.

BONUS: Reddit just turned 10. To celebrate the site’s anniversary, we’ve listed the ten most popular posts of all time. And you can check out the site’s astonishing numbers and figures here.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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