5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Rachel Lowe of the Wanderers is challenged by Natasha Rigby of the Glory during the round 14 W-League match between the Western Sydney Wanderers and Perth Glory at Popondetta Park on January 29, 2017 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Jason McCawley/Getty Images)

Plenty of news this morning – so much so that today’s edition is really “6 things”:

1. Startup bank Tyro is letting customers make payments through Siri voice commands. The fintech company is claiming an Australia-first with the time-saving technology that allows payments from its transaction accounts without logging onto internet banking. Read more on the announcement.

2. Qantas just connected 200 devices to its new high-speed wi-fi on a charter flight from Sydney to Brisbane. And they all achieved speeds of between 7 and 12Mbps, which is more than good enough for high-definition video streaming. Read more on the milestone test and the rollout plans here.

3. A strange UFO device has been invented to discipline coders. A Dynatrace executive visited Business Insider this week to show off its new ‘UFO’ device that lights up red when a programmer is about to leave the office after leaving loose ends untied. Read more on the corporate visual behaviour aid.

4. Games on popular online platform Steam are about to get 10% more expensive. Sister publication Kotaku reports that from March the company will be adding consumption taxes to prices for Australia, Switzerland, South Korea, Japan, New Zealand, Iceland, South Africa, and India.

5. A software glitch made the latest South Australian blackouts a lot worse than it should have been. The Register reports that the deliberate blackout earlier this month brought on by excessive air-conditioner demand on the grid affected 60,000 more households than intended, due to software – before humans rectified the mistake.

BONUS: Coding bootcamps Coder Factory Academy and Node Girls have teamed up with Football Federation Australia for a soccer-themed hackathon. Read more here.

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