5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Indoor shot on Samsung Galaxy S7 – downsized due to website limitations. (Image: Tony Yoo)

Season’s greetings! I know you are all dying to get out of the office, but cast your eyes over these must-read tech stories before you log off. As “5 things in tech” signs off for the year, the Business Insider Australia team would like to wish you a safe and happy summer break!

1. I’ve used my fair share of smartphones, but both the best and the worst handsets I ever used both came along in 2016. Have a read of how the Samsung Galaxy S7 and Oppo R9 fared after extended use.

2. Victoria is well on its way to having autonomous vehicles on its Eastlink motorway by 2018. Initial testing has just completed as part of an 18-month project conducted with Australian Road Research Board and La Trobe University. Read more here.

3. Expat Australian startup Plutora has scored $18.5 million in a funding round led by Macquarie Capital. The AFR reports the now California-based company founded by Sydneysiders boasts a client portfolio including the likes of Telstra, Barclays, eBay, Vodafone, ING Bank, Macy’s, Dell and Pepsico.

4. The Sydney tech CEO that was charged last month with more than $220,000 worth of fraud has been named. iTnews reports CMS IT’s Angelo Millena faced court yesterday relating to alleged crimes conducted with Derrick Belan, the former boss of the National Union of Workers NSW.

5. Amazon’s cloud computing arm has carried the whole company to a breakout year on Wall Street. And TechCrunch reports that the investors’ darling will only get better in 2017.

Merry Christmas! Please email me your story tips or find me on Twitter.

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