5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Costolo dorsey twitter ipoREUTERS/Brendan McDermidTwitter CEO Dick Costolo (R) with Jack Dorsey (L) and other cofounders, Biz Stone (2nd L) and Evan Williams.

Good morning! It’s Tuesday. Here’s what’s happening.

1. There are a bunch of reasons for Twitter’s management shuffle. None of them are good. Twitter recently sent a not-very-coded message to shareholders that it won’t allow Jack Dorsey to be its permanent CEO unless he stepped down from Square. Get the lowdown here.

2. Divvy raises millions. The digital commercial car parking startup has raised $2.5 million in a Series A round, adding to the initial $300,000 in seed funding it raised last year, as well as signing deals with property managers such as Frank Knight as it expands. More here.

3. The music streaming debate continues. The former CEO of Pandora isn’t impressed by the Apple/Taylor Swift debacle and this freelance photographer says Swift is a hypocrite. Menwhile, the kerfuffle is actually beneficial for Apple. Find out why here.

4. Aussie 3D-printed jaw joints. Australian startup 3D Medical (3DM) developed and printed a customised titanium jaw joint, which was successfully used in surgery to correct a rare jaw deformity. Read all about it here.

5. Google enters the news race. Facebook, Apple, Snapchat, and Twitter are all knee-deep in competition to shape the future of news, from article creation to consumption. More here.

BONUS: Cats can fly. It’s not really tech – well, there’s GoPro footage – but watch the awesome moment this pilot realises, mid-flight, that a cat has stowed away for a ride. Check out the video below. More here.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.