5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

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1. The Victorian government has lured well-known US accelerator 500 Startups to Melbourne. LaunchVic’s $2 million assistance will see the new 500 Melbourne program support 40 Australian startups in the next two years, as well as invest in other ventures alongside angel and institutional investors. Read more here.

2. New equity crowdfunding laws have passed the senate. Crowdfunding platforms like Equitise and CrowdfundUP are ready to service Australia businesses under the new provisions, but small proprietary companies are still prohibited from such funding… meaning most startups will need to wait for further reform. Read more here.

3. The mobile phone numbers of Australian ministers and former prime ministers were accidentally published online. The numbers appeared on a report of parliamentary phone bills, with opposition spokesperson Ed Husic saying “It’s a sad reflection of the times that you now expect anything digital at the federal level to fail”. Read more here.

4. Former Macquarie chief Allan Moss has been revealed as an investor in Adelaide tech company Sine. The AFR reports that he invested almost 18 months ago, and since then Sine has sealed some blockbuster deals with clients such as Hewlett Packard for its seamless wi-fi transition tech.

5. Salesforce’s big annual conference, Salesforce World Tour, is on today in Sydney. The Australian has the tales of two local startups that have expanded into the US through the Salesforce Ventures program. The founders of Autopilot and Bugcrowd both encourage entrepreneurs to make the trek across the Pacific, but disagree on the way to get there.

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