5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Startups getting to work at Telstra’s accelerator muru-D.

It’s Tuesday. There’s a lot to get up-to-speed on, here’s what you need to know.

1. It’s Crossroads day! StartupAUS has released its annual report detailing the state of Australia’s startup sector and it doesn’t look good. The umbrella body that represents startups in Australia says Government rules mean the country could miss out on creating the next Facebook or Google. It has put forward an eight phase plan which it thinks could help. All the details are here.

2. Tech jobs crush mining ones when it comes to revenue per employee. Technology companies generate jobs with higher revenue per employee than almost any other sector, according to StartupAUS. This chart says it all.

3. The Kiwi’s beat Australia, again. Australia has one of the lowest rates of angel investment and venture capital investment in the developed world. This chart from StartupAUS shows New Zealand even has a higher rate.

4. Freshdesk just landed $50 million in funding and has opened an Australian office. The cloud customer service company which faces up against the likes of Zendesk has secured another round of funding from Google Capital, Accel Partners and Tiger Global. It’s also hiring in Australia. More here.

5. Qantas CEO Alan Joyce has a clever new cloud-based yield management system which crunches a bunch of data to determine how much you pay for your ticket. The AFR reports the seat pricing system will assess numerous, individual variables including a customer’s travel plans, how many trips are likely on the trip, how many seats are left on the flight and what competitors are charging. There’s more here.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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