5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Google Home. (Source: supplied)

Welcome to Wednesday:

1. It’s a scary thought to turn down $9 million. But that’s exactly what the founder of retail tech startup Brauz did two years ago when he found the investors didn’t completely share his vision for the business. Now the platform is up and running and wrapped up $2.25 million in seed funding. Read more on the Melbourne startup here.

2. A whopping $625 million went into Australian startups in the quarter ending June. That’s according to industry tracking service Techboard, which added up all the equity, debt, acquisitions and grants during those three months. It seems fintech is going gangbusters, nabbing more than half of that total pool. Read more on the breakdown here.

3. Just 10 companies paid more than 85% of the dividends from the tech sector on the ASX and NZX. Check out which ones they are, while you consider that Telstra is now talking about reducing dividends to better compete with tech giants like Amazon and Google.

4. A marketplace that removes the real estate agent from the rental process has launched in Sydney. Rentwolf already has 5000 users registered, with 650 landlords among them. Read more on how the platform provides complete transparency on the bidding process, “like what happens with the stock exchange”.

5. You can now ask Google where the “servo” is. Google’s domestic voice assistant device Google Home is on sale tomorrow, and the tech giant is spruiking its ability to understand the Australian accent and idioms. The popular Amazon Echo has not yet come to Australia, so Google will be hoping to rule the local market as the first mover in the smart home market. Read more here.

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