5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Samples of HTC U11 glass panels showing how the colour was applied for the liquid surface look. (Source: HTC)

Here’s the top news for your Wednesday:

1. Major smartphone maker HTC unveiled its new flagship U11 in Taipei on Tuesday evening. Companies that are not called Apple or Samsung these days have to do some crazy stuff to get noticed in a fierce market, so the Taiwanese firm has come up with the ability to squeeze your phone to perform actions – like take selfies one-handed or take pictures underwater. And they’re throwing in noise-cancelling headphones to boot.

2. But if the HTC U11 fails, it could be the beginning of the end for smartphones. If all of its new features raise no more than a yawn from the public, then it might be a sign that a saturated market now has “phone fatigue”. Is the world ready to move on from smartphones?

3. There could be some pain ahead for business travellers. Australia is considering a notebook computer ban on incoming flights from certain countries, similar to what the USA enacted in March. While prime minister Malcolm Turnbull ruled it out at the time, he said yesterday that the situation would be reviewed according to latest intelligence. Read more here.

4. Australian parcel delivery startup Sendle has recruited the eBay’s former head of shipping. Apurva Chiranewala has joined Sendle as its new head of growth as the company looks to move on after its legal victory against Australia Post. Read more here.

5. An NBN contractor has sunk into administration owing millions and terminating 80 jobs. CRN reports the administrator for Daly International, which had offices in all the mainland capitals, has found up to $5.1 million owed to unsecured creditors. The company also had contracting relationships with Vodafone and Optus.

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