5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Swift founder Joel Macdonald. Image: Supplied.

It’s Tuesday! Here’s what you need to know today.

1. Google wants to put solar panels on your roof and it now has a way to tell you how much you’d save by switching to renewable energy. Overnight it launched Project Sunroof which aims to help homeowners decide if their roof is a good fit for installing solar panels. More here.

2. Australian logistics startup Swift closed a $US675,000 angel round to continue its US expansion. The round was led by BlackSheep Capital and BlueChilli Venture Fund. Founder Joel Macdonald, a former AFL player, recently packed up his Melbourne life and relocated to New York to build out the startup. There’s more here.

3. NAB has struck a deal with Simply Wall Street, an app which makes it easier for people to invest in Australia, US and UK sharemarkets. The bank hopes it will entice customers who have stopped engaging with its existing platforms. Simply Wall Street has also closed a $600,000 funding round led by Innovation Capital founder Michael Quinn. More here.

4. Australian tech entrepreneur Zhenya Tsvetnenko’s ASX-listed digital payments startup Digital CC has landed a deal with US payments firm CoinX to provide a money transmitter service across the States. His AirPocket product is attempting to take on Western Union by enabling cash to be transferred through a peer-to-peer model, cutting out intermediaries.

5. The government is launching a cute little bipartisan group called “friends of the internet”. Communications minister Malcolm Turnbull and shadow minister Jason Clare will both be involved in the group which is meant to promote internet- friendly policy from September 8. There’s more here.

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