5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Usher performs onstage during ‘The UR Experience’ tour at Staples Center on November 21, 2014 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/WireImage)

Here’s Wednesday’s top tech news:

1. A tech giant just gave a Melbourne university a $135 million software grant. German company Siemens gave its industrial software, usually used by deep-pocketed customers like the US Navy and Formula 1 racing teams, to Swinburne University of Technology for use at its new Industry 4.0 ‘Factory of the Future’ facility. Read more here.

2. Job seeking site Seek saw its shares get hammered this morning. The company posted a net profit of $340.2 million for the 2017 financial year but the market was not impressed because it was a 5% decrease on last year. Read more here.

3. Check out all the humans moving in. Aerial imaging tech company Nearmap provided Business Insider before and after shots of the 10 fastest growing regions in Australia, and the differences in just a few years are startling. See the photos here.

4. US urban music star Usher has joined an Australian startup as it raised $10.5 million. ASX-listed MSMCI, which is producing an international talent show to be delivered over mobile phones, signed up the Grammy Award winner as chief creative director, meaning he’ll be judge and mentor on the Megastar program. $5.7 million of the new capital raised will go towards paying celebrity judges. Read more.

5. Australian startups are packing up and moving to Singapore. Business Insider’s Peter Farquhar spoke to five tech businesses that have moved or expanded to the city-state to ask why – and it’s not just for the awesome food. Read more.

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