5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Image Alphatise / Twitter.

It’s Tuesday. Here’s what you need to know in Australian tech today.

1. There’s been a development in the Alphatise saga. Deloitte has released its creditor’s report which reveals some intimate details about the e-commerce startup’s demise. At the same time, company co-founder Paul Pearson is attempting to resurrect Alphatise from the depths of debt, management stoushes and its time in administration. The details are here.

2. AirTree Ventures has invested $1.2 million into Melbourne-based rostering startup Ento. The company was launched back in 2009 by Aulay Macaulay and enables businesses to coordinate rosters for hundreds of employees. It signed its first international clients in April this year. There’s more here.

3. Fail fast and cheap is what founders in the startup sector are told. But embracing failure and owning the fear happens at different rates around the world. This chart shows the fear of failure for entrepreneurs around the world.

4. There’s no hard and fast way to picking winners in the tech sector. But venture capitalists do have a few things they look for when investing in startups. Starfish Ventures principal John Dyson has four elements he looks for before throwing cash at companies.

5. Telstra is bolstering its financial services tech division. Telstra has invested in enepath, a Singapore-based voice technology company which services the finance sector. Matthew Lempriere, Telstra’s global head of financial services market segment, said the telco is expanding its financial services portfolio and will continue to build upon its domestic and global capabilities over the coming months.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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