5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

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It’s Thursday! Here’s what you need to know in Australian tech today.

1. Startups are a little peeved they’ve been lumped in with small businesses. In the Twitter words of Bluechilli cool-dude Alan Jones “It’s where I began, not what I became”. In a blog post Jones said while he was pleased with the support the government handed down in its $5.5 billion small business package, “we tech startup entrepreneurs aren’t building ‘small businesses’. We are trying to build billion dollar businesses” and the initiatives didn’t go far enough to improve this journey. Full story is here.

2. Australian startups are feeling like a good chunk of the budget measures won’t have an impact on their businesses. Fishburners has crunched the numbers on how their startups are feeling post-budget and put it into a handy chart, which you can see here.

3. Uber is hunting for MBA grads in Australia’s top business schools. The ride-hailing app uses a similar recruitment strategy in the US and Europe, hosting seminars and happy hours at some top universities to entice students into its ranks. You can read more about it here.

4. ASX-listed tech company SkyFii has raised $2.8 million at 22 cents a share. The funds will be used to deliver a number of contracts it has landed both in Australia and internationally. Earlier this year the company landed a deal with Westfield to fit out 20 of its shopping centres with Wi-Fi.

5. This puts things into perspective. This chart shows how hard it is to make a killing in venture capital by adding up all the unicorns (startups that are worth more than $US1 billion) and then ranking them against mammoth tech companies. Hint: Even combined, they’re still worth less than Facebook.

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