3 style lessons every guy can learn from Tim Cook's ill-fitting suit

Tim Cook: tech innovator, precedent-breaking CEO, style icon?

Maybe not so much that last one, if a recent picture proves anything. The Apple CEO recently tweeted out a photograph taken with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi during a trip the the Mediterranean country to launch Europe’s first iOS development center.

After comparing Renzi’s masterfully tailored suit to Cook’s mess of rags, one thing becomes clear: Cook has no idea what he’s doing when it comes to wearing suits.

Observe:

  • Mistake #1: The suit jacket just plain doesn’t fit at all. It’s clearly a size too big, and, apart from it not being tailored correctly (or at all), the shoulders don’t fit. The shoulders are the most important part of any suit jacket, as they can’t be adjusted.
  • Mistake #2: The pants are too long. Sure, full breaks (a full fold where the pants hit the shoes) are in now, and guys are wearing their pants a little longer. Cook’s pants, however, are so long they make him look shorter than he actually is.
  • Mistake #2: Black on black is extremely boring. A black tie with a black suit and a white shirt? This isn’t a funeral, Tim! Cook could have mixed it up here in any number of ways, but the dark palette casts a shadow over what is surely a fine accomplishment for Apple and for Italy.

Compare these mistakes to Renzi’s suit, which was born out of a country known for its fine tailoring and suiting, and we see what a difference a well-fitting suit can really make.

With Cook’s $10 million salary, he can surely afford some sort of tailor. We strongly suggest that next time he wears a suit, he start over with a clean slate and bring it to a tailor before he plans on wearing it. These mistakes are easily avoided.

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