22 Quotes That Take You Inside Albert Einstein's Revolutionary Mind

Back in 1904, a 25-year-old Albert Einstein would spend his afternoons pushing a stroller.

You could find him “wheeling a baby carriage on the streets of Bern, Switzerland, halting now and then, unmindful of the traffic around him, to scribble down some mathematical symbols in a notebook that shared the carriage with his infant son, also named Albert,” the New York Times wrote in its obituary of the great scientist.

“Out of those symbols came the most explosive ideas in the age-old strivings of man to fathom the mystery of his universe,” the Times added.

In his lifetime, Einstein would change the world, describing the workings of reality better than anyone since Isaac Newton and revealing the capabilities of the atom bomb.

In time, Einstein’s name has become a byword for genius.

Here’s the genius, in his own words.

On scope

'The only way to escape the corruptible effect of praise is to go on working.'

(Smithsonian, February 1979)

On politics

'The only way to escape the corruptible effect of praise is to go on working.'

(Smithsonian, February 1979)

On certainty

'As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certian; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.'

(Address to Prussian Academy of Science, Jan. 2921)

On humility

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On his growth

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On common sense

'The only way to escape the corruptible effect of praise is to go on working.'

(Smithsonian, February 1979)

On success

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On nationalism

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On mystery

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On solitude

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On self-presentation

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On education

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On motivation

'As a human being, one has been endowed with just enough intelligence to be able to see clearly how utterly inadequate that intelligence is when confronted with what exists.'

(Letter to Queen Elisabeth of Belgium, Sept. 1932)

On thinking

'Most teachers waste their time by asking questions that are intended to discover what a pupil does not know, whereas the true art of questioning is to discover what the pupil does know or is capable of knowing.'

('Conversations with Albert Einstein,' 1920)

On work ethic

'Most teachers waste their time by asking questions that are intended to discover what a pupil does not know, whereas the true art of questioning is to discover what the pupil does know or is capable of knowing.'

('Conversations with Albert Einstein,' 1920)

On childhood

'Most teachers waste their time by asking questions that are intended to discover what a pupil does not know, whereas the true art of questioning is to discover what the pupil does know or is capable of knowing.'

('Conversations with Albert Einstein,' 1920)

On the role of science

'Most teachers waste their time by asking questions that are intended to discover what a pupil does not know, whereas the true art of questioning is to discover what the pupil does know or is capable of knowing.'

('Conversations with Albert Einstein,' 1920)

On the hustle

'The only way to escape the corruptible effect of praise is to go on working.'

(Smithsonian, February 1979)

From the world-changing theorist to the world-changing entrepreneur

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