Are You Smart Enough To Work At Bloomberg? Take The Test

Nevada School

Think you’re smart enough to write for the most successful news business on the planet?

Here’s your chance to find out.

We asked current and former Bloombergers to describe the written test.

Here’s what you’ll have to know.  (The questions are on top.  The answers are below the images.  No peeking!)

Can you ace the test? Click through to try! —>

Q: Who is the Bank of America CEO?

A: Brian Moynihan.

Q: Eric Schmidt is the chairman and CEO of...

A: Google.

Q: Rupert Murdoch is a chairman for...

A: News Corp.

Q: Who is the leader of France?

A: Nicolas Sarkozy.

Q: Who is the leader of China?

A: Hu Jintao.

Q: What does OPEC stand for?

A: organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.

Q: What does SEC stand for?

A: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

What does NAFTA stand for?

A: North American Free Trade Agreement.

Q: What is the currency unit in France?

A: Euro.

Q: What is the currency unit in Switzerland?

A: Swiss Franc (CHF).

Q: What is China's currency?

A: Renminbi (RMB).

Q: Which one of these is not like the other: UBS, Swiss National Bank, Goldman Sachs, European Investment Bank?

A: Goldman Sachs. It's not a lending bank.

Which has more value: a Euro or an American dollar?

A: Euro.

What angular degree is formed when an analogue clock reads 3:15?

A: 7.5 degrees.

A: Shorting a stock means to sell it first then buy it back after the market (or that stock in particular) goes down.

A: Define inflation.

A: The rate at which the general level of prices for goods and service is rising, and, subsequently, purchasing power is falling. Central banks attempt to stop severe inflation, along with severe deflation, in an attempt to keep the excessive growth of prices to a minimum.

As inflation rises, every dollar will buy a smaller percentage of a good. For example, if the inflation rate is 2%, then a $1 pack of gum will cost $1.02 in a year.

Most countries' central banks will try to sustain an inflation rate of 2-3%.

(Source: Investopedia)

//

Define market capitalisation.

A: The total dollar market value of all of a company's outstanding shares. Market capitalisation is calculated by multiplying a company's shares outstanding by the current market price of one share. The investment community uses this figure to determining a company's size, as opposed to sales or total asset figures.

Frequently referred to as 'market cap'.

(Source: Investopedia)

Define recession.

A: A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, employment, real income and wholesale-retail trade. The technical indicator of a recession is two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth as measured by a country's gross domestic product (GDP); although the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) does not necessarily need to see this occur to call a recession.

(Source: Investopedia)

And now for the written portion! Write about a news story that could influence a market.

Look at BusinessInsider.com to find one. We've got plenty of them.

Write your own obituary.

Have fun!

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