17 Inspiring Quotes From Maile Carnegie: Mum, Businesswoman, Head Of Google Australia

Maile Carnegie

Through her roles as managing director of household cleaning and beauty products manufacturer Procter & Gamble in Australia to MD at Google Australia and New Zealand, Maile Carnegie has made family the cornerstone of her life, building around it her career in a way that many would find unorthodox.

Carnegie is an advocate of flexible work, women in the tech space and the digital revolution in Australia.

Here are some quotes from the female powerhouse leading the Australian arm of one of the biggest technology companies in the world.

On prioritising your workload

    “Dealing with information overload is a skill. You have to start getting good filters around what is considered urgent and what is considered important and be able to really filter through the information into those two categories. If you can’t do that you will suffocate.”

    In an interview with Marie Claire in March this year.

On flexible work practices

    “I very much take advantage of flexible work practices,” she says. “It doesn’t mean I don’t work hard, but it enables me to better balance commitments with my husband.”

    In an interview with Women’s Agenda in March 2013.

On Australia’s economic security

    “Overall, I see Australia is in a good place. Even ignoring mining assets we still have a massive lever in our interest rates – if and when it is appropriate to use it. The US and UK have used up all their stimulus.”

    In an interview with BusinessDay in 2011.

On creativity versus data in the workplace

    “These days in business, big data often takes over and we often find that people get so tied up in data analysis that they forget about creativity… I think you need creativity if you want to get to any new worthwhile place.”

    In an interview with c-store in February 2013.

On gender diversity

    “Companies need to walk away from the rhetoric and talking about it to actually starting to measure it (gender diversity). The companies that I’ve seen make progress are the ones that ground themselves in the data. Not just top-line stuff, but a detailed look at where their biggest problem areas are – where their participation rates drop off.”

    In an interview with Women’s Agenda in March 2013.

On work-life balance

    “I make a conscious choice to have work-life integration, as opposed to separation because that’s what enables me to see my family. I am basically willing to do stuff in odd hours and odd times and places. People look at the negatives about that… [but] For me, I look at the positives, as it means if I have to go out for two hours in the middle of the day to see my son win an award at his school, then I do it.”

    In an interview with Marie Claire in March this year.

On achieving success

    She recalls the best advice she has ever received was from her husband:”‘It is harder to define success than it is to achieve success.’ I think this is particularly true for women as we have many options we can pursue.”

    In an interview with BRW in March 2013.

On raising her children

    Admitting that her family has started getting into robot battles, Carnegie says: “What they’re doing is using their imagination to build a robot with the arms and legs to beat another robot. But you have still got to program all the bits and pieces to make the robot work… We haven’t sat our children down and said, ‘OK, boys, we are going to show you how to code and program a computer.’ It’s what they are doing, but to them it’s just something they enjoy.”

    In an interview with The Australian in July this year.

On women in tech

Photo: Justin Sullivan/ Getty
    “I am committed to getting more women into technology… Female participation is a critical issue for the industry and we are trying to do something about it.”

    In an interview with Marie Claire in March this year.

On leadership balance

    “I learned that either delivering short term or long-term results is easy; exceptional leaders balance and deliver both. I remind myself of this every time I am creating the strategy and action plan for a new role.”

    In an interview with BRW in March 2013.

On career and convenience

    “I love being back in Australia but who knows where careers will take you. We’ll see what the future holds. Wherever I am I love working on businesses that have growth opportunities like the convenience channel. So wherever I am convenience is one of the channels I definitely want to be in.”

    In an interview with c-store in February 2013.

On being a working mum

    “But working women have a tendency to assume the angst is there only because they are working. Don’t assume giving up work is the answer. The angst doesn’t go away.”

    In an interview with Marie Claire in March this year.

On the Australian tax system

    “What I hope for on tax is that we all start fixing the system. Getting a simpler and more transparent tax system, globally and locally, is what will change outcomes… All that passion (aimed at Google and other international companies which use the tax laws to their advantage) should be focused on fixing the system.”

    In an interview with The Australian in July this year.

On the digital revolution

    Talking about the digital revolution in Australia she says, “We’re now on chapter one, maybe chapter two. But it’s a 10-chapter book.”

    In an interview with The Australian in July this year. 8

On business being fun

    “I know I am going to sound like a dork but in my spare time I like to solve business problems.”

    In an interview with BusinessDay in 2011.

On disrupting the marketplace

    “If you are passionate about innovation and you look at where the real disruptive innovation is happening, it’s either in the technology industry or it is fundamentally been driven by the technology.”

    In an interview with Marie Claire in March this year.

On keeping up with global trends

    “The long-term challenge for Australia is how do we, as a minimum, keep pace with the global revolution that is happening? But the more immediate challenge is how to make sure we don’t slip further behind.”

    In an interview with The Australian in July this year.

NOW WATCH: Executive Life videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.