15 Stocks That Traders Are Shorting Like Crazy

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Photo: AP Images

Stocks are selling off today.  This is  good news for the short-sellers, who profit when prices go down.We screened the stock market to see which companies where being shorted the most (as measured by short as a percentage of float).

Electronics retailers and anything associated with for-profit education are still plagued by the bears.

The most heavily shorted stock on our list seems to come out of left field.

Higher One Holdings

Ticker:
ONE

Short per cent of float:
34.55 per cent

YTD return:
+18.44 per cent

Sector:
Higher education payment systems

The company has cut 2012 revenue estimates 7 per cent.

Source: NASDAQ

USANA Health Sciences Inc

Ticker:
USNA

Short per cent of float:
35.83 per cent

YTD return:
+32.25 per cent

Sector: Vitamin and nutritional supplements

USANA reported record sales last quarter.

Source: Business Wire

CARBO Ceramics Inc

Ticker:
CRR

Short per cent of float:
35.99 per cent

YTD return:
-31.71 per cent

Sector: Resource products and services

CARBO Ceramics beat slightly on revenues and missed estimates on earnings per share.

Source: Daily Finance

Radioshack

Ticker:
RSH

Short per cent of float:
36.45 per cent

YTD return:
-46.76 per cent

Sector: Eletronics retail

Only one out of 21 analysts maintain RSH 'buy' ratings.

Source: Schaeffer Research

Overseas Shipholding Group

Ticker:
OSG

Short per cent of float:
38.2 per cent

YTD return:
+6.22 per cent

Sector:
Ocean freighters

The company has now experienced at least six straight quarters of losses.

Source: Google Finance

ITT Educational Services

Ticker:
ESI

Short per cent of float:
39.67 per cent

YTD return:
+16.00 per cent

Sector:
For-profit education

Revenue declined 10.8% YOY on lower enrollment.

Source: Zacks

SUPERVALU

Ticker:
SVU

Short per cent of float:
41.95 per cent

YTD return:
-28.94 per cent

Sector:
Grocery chain

SUPERVALU was recently de-listed from the S&P 500.

Source: Marketwatch

KB Home

Ticker:
KBH

Short per cent of float:
47.07 per cent

YTD return:
+31.10 per cent

Sector:
Homebuilder

Q1 revenue was up 29% YOY.

Source: Google Finance

Molycorp

Ticker:
MCP

Short per cent of float:
48.74 per cent

YTD return:
+17.18 per cent

Sector:
Rare earths mining

Analysts expect EPS to grow 172 per cent through 2013.

Source: Zacks

InvenSense

Ticker:
INVN

Short per cent of float:
49.34 per cent

YTD return:
+65.26 per cent

Sector:
Digital circuits

Droid smartphone's use the company's motion sensors.

Source: Moneymorning.com

GameStop

Ticker:
GME

Short per cent of float:
49.46 per cent

YTD return:
-5.26 per cent

Sector:
video game retail

Video game sales fell 25 per cent in March from a year earlier to $1.1 billion, marking the fourth month of decline.

Source: Yahoo

Barnes & Noble

Ticker:
BKS

Short per cent of float:
49.68 per cent

YTD return:
+34.6 per cent

Sector:
Books retail

The stocks is already down 19 per cent since Monday's Microsoft announcement.

Source: Google Finance

Bridgepoint Education

Ticker:
BPI

Short per cent of float:
53.91 per cent

YTD return:
-12.39 per cent

Sector:
For-profit education

New enrollment dropped 12 per cent from the year ago period, the company recently reported.

Source: San Diego Source

HHgregg

Ticker:
HGG

Short per cent of float:
54.37 per cent

YTD return:
-29.27 per cent

Sector:
Electronics retail

The company expects fiscal 2012 comparable store sales of flat to positive 2%.

Source: Reuters

Teavana Holdings

Ticker:
TEA

Short per cent of float:
60.02 per cent

YTD return:
+12.62 per cent

Sector:
Tea retail

The company recently purchased a Canadian tea retailer.

Source: 24/7 Wall Street

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