15 Reasons Why Obama’s Claim That “A Second Depression Is No Longer A Possibility” Is Dead Wrong

barack obama president

(This post appeared at the author’s blog.)

Is the United States economy headed for another Great Depression?  Well, according to Barack Obama, that is no longer possible.  According to Obama, the United States has avoided an economic collapse and is headed for another wonderful era of growth and prosperity. 

But is Obama right?  Do the economic signs indicate that the U.S. is headed towards recovery or towards even more difficult times?  As you shall see below, there is no way in the world that Barack Obama should have ever said that “a second depression is no longer a possibility.”

In fact, as the U.S. financial system continues to crumble, it is likely that those words will be exploited by his political adversaries again and again.  If you are a politician and you are going to issue a guarantee, you had better be able to deliver the goods.  In this case, Obama is making a promise that defies all of the economic data.

Video of Obama making his declaration that “a second depression is no longer a possibility” is posted below….     

So why is Obama wrong?  Well, if you want a full examination of why the United States is headed for an economic collapse, please read the rest of this blog.  In this article we just wanted to highlight

A Few Reasons Why The U.S. Is Headed For A Complete Financial Meltdown >

#1 New home sales are plunging

The U.S. housing market is continuing to come apart like a 20 dollar suit. The U.S. government just announced that in January sales of new homes plunged to the lowest level on record. This is not a sign that the U.S. economy is recovering.

#2 Overdue mortgages are ON THE RISE

In fact, a lot more houses may be on the market soon. The number of U.S. mortgages more than 90 days overdue has climbed to 5.1 per cent. An increasing number of Americans find themselves simply unable to keep up with their mortgages. This is another indication that things are getting worse instead of better.

#3 One in four homes are underwater

Over 24% of all homes with mortgages in the United States were underwater as of the end of 2009. So in other words, nearly one out of every four U.S. homeowners with a mortgage owe more on their homes than the homes are worth. That is a giant mess, and it is going to be very painful to untangle it.

#4 Adjustable rate mortgages are about to reset... again

If all of that wasn't bad enough, a massive 'second wave' of adjustable rate mortgages is scheduled to reset beginning in 2010. The 'first wave' of mortgage resets from 2006 - 2008 absolutely crippled the U.S. housing market, and this second wave threatens to make things far worse.

#5 Consumer confidence is DECLINING

Confidence among U.S. consumers fell dramatically in February to the lowest level in 10 months. Consumers that are not confident in the economy tend to hold on to their money. If consumers don't spend their money then the economy is not going to grow.

#6 Commercial real estate will be the next shoe to fall

Many analysts are predicting that the next 'shoe to fall' in the ongoing financial crisis will be commercial real estate. U.S. commercial property values are down approximately 40 per cent since 2007 and currently 18 per cent of all office space in the United States is sitting vacant.

#7 CRE loans are souring VERY fast

In fact, the commercial real estate sector is just now entering the danger zone. It is projected that the largest commercial real estate loan losses will be experienced in 2011 and the years following. Some analysts are estimating that losses from commercial real estate at U.S. banks alone could range as high as 200 to 300 billion dollars.

#8 Now real estate lending has flatlined

All of these bad loans are causing banks to dramatically slow down real estate lending. During the middle of the decade, the number of commercial real estate loans exploded, but now the bubble has burst, and commercial real estate lending has dropped through the floor.

#9 The real estate crisis is still devastating small and mid-size banks

All of these real estate problems are decimating America's small and mid-size banks. The FDIC has announced that the number of banks on its 'problem' list climbed to 702 at the end of 2009. This is compared to only 552 banks that were on the problem list at the end of September and only 252 banks that were on the problem list at the end of 2008. As you can see from these figures, the banking crisis in the U.S. is escalating rapidly.

#10 Then there's the OBSCENE growth of the national debt

The U.S. national debt is now over 12 trillion dollars and it is rising at a rate of about 3.8 billion dollars per day. In fact, some analysts are projecting that the United States will borrow more money in 2010 than the rest of the governments of the world combined.

#11 We're handing out debt so fast no one can afford to buy it... except for ourselves

The financial mess in the U.S. is scaring off other nations from buying U.S. government debt. In fact, the Federal Reserve now has to 'buy' most U.S. government debt because others are extremely hesitant to purchase the massive amount of bad paper the U.S. is trying to sell. In addition, other countries are now using the massive amounts of U.S. government debt that they already hold as leverage. A major U.K. newspaper is warning that evidence is mounting that recent Chinese sales of U.S. Treasury bonds are intended as a warning to the United States government rather than simply being part of a routine portfolio shift.

#12 It's not just America... the entire global economy has slowed

But the U.S. is not the only economy that is suffering during this economic downturn. The entire world economy has been impacted. The World Trade organisation has announced that world trade fell by 12% last year as the world economic crisis caused the biggest drop in world trade since 1945.

#13 The global economy is getting worse... get ready for a whole wave of Greeces

The United States should not expect the rest of the world to pick up the economic slack either. The crisis in Greece has made headlines all over the globe recently, and Harvard University Professor Kenneth Rogoff is warning that we could soon see a huge wave of sovereign defaults.

#14 Our oldest trading partner, Europe, is about to cut back severely

The reality is that things are so bad in some parts of Europe that it could take years and years to recover. In fact, the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund is warning that financial 'belt-tightening' in Europe will be 'extremely painful' and could take up to 20 years. The truth is that if Europe is suffering economically, it will be very difficult for the U.S. to recover at the same time.

#15 Many top finance gurus are warning of THE END

In addition, some of the most prominent investors in the world know what is coming and are issuing their own warnings. For example, Charlie Munger, Warren Buffett's long-time business partner, has warned in a new article for Slate.com that 'it's basically over' for the U.S. economy. Marc Faber is warning that things are going to get so bad that it is time for investors to buy farmland and gold.

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