11 Extravagant Ways Rich Tech Executives Have Spent Their Fortunes

How do wealthy tech entrepreneurs spend the millions and billions of dollars they’ve made?

Some give it to charities. Others party portions of it away and buy really expensive toys.

Here are some of the most extravagent ways people like Sean Parker and Larry Page have spent their fortunes.

Sean Parker may be spending up to $10 million on his wedding to Alexandra Lenas, complete with custom-made costumes for each guest, a backdrop, and man-made waterfalls.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos* invested $42 million in building a 10,000-year clock.

The clock Bezos is having built in Texas is meant to serve as a symbol to make people think long-term.

'If we think long-term, we can accomplish things that we couldn't otherwise accomplish,' Bezos said in an interview. We humans are getting awfully sophisticated in technological ways and have a lot of potential to be very dangerous to ourselves, and it seems to me that we as a species will have to start thinking longer term. This is a symbol, I think symbols can be very powerful.'

Disclosure: Jeff Bezos is an investor in Business Insider through Bezos Expeditions.

Early Facebook investor Peter Thiel has invested millions in anti-ageing technology because he wants to live forever. He also has invested heavily in establishing colonies of startups off the coast of California.

Peter Thiel gave $3.5 million in 2006 on anti-ageing researcher and it's well known the early Facebook investor wants to live forever.

'He has put money into the projects of more than a dozen biotech companies, from DNA sequencing to cancer treatment to a mobile app called 100 Plus, which encourages healthy behaviours intended to extend lifespan beyond 100 years,' Financial Times writes of his desire to cheat death.

Also, Thiel has invested in Seastead Institute which wants to 'colonize the world's oceans.' In other words, it is putting up structures in the oceans to avoid dealing with the rules and regulations of different governments. One in particular is Blueseeds, which is off the coast of California, and has the goal of helping non-U.S. entrepreneurs get access to Silicon Valley's resources without Visas. Thiel has donated more than half-a-million to Seastead.

Mark Cuban spent $110,000 at a club after his basketball team, the Dallas Mavericks, beat the Heat in the NBA Championship. He also paid $40,000 to save a St. Patrick's day parade.

Mark Cuban spent $90,000 on a bottle of champagne and then some while celebrating the Mavericks win against the Miami Heat in the 2011 NBA National Championship. He reportedly tipped the wait staff $20,000. 'Worth every penny,' he told NY Post via email.

In 2012, he paid $40,000 to save a St. Patrick's Day parade in Dallas. 'I just thought it would be fair that people should be able to kill as many brain cells on Greenville Avenue as I have in my life,' Cuban said.

Richard Branson bought Necker Island in the British Virgin Islands, but it only cost him $180,000.

Branson talked down a $5 million asking price for Necker Island when he was 28 to $180,000. He purchased the British Virgin Island from Lord Cobham who needed some quick cash.

Over the course of five years, he spent $10 million building up a resort on the island. In 2006, his land was worth an estimated $60 million.

Larry Ellison has a collection of mansions, and he has spent ~ $200 million buying a strip of houses in Malibu.

Oracle founder Larry Ellison has mansions all over the place.

Recently, he decided to sell his Lake Tahoe mansion to build a bigger one nearby. He also owns Porcupine Creek, complete with a golf course on the property.

Over the course of a few years, Ellison has dropped between $200 and $250 million on a strip of houses in Carbon Beach too.

Yammer's David Sacks through himself an 18th Century-Style 40th birthday party with Snoop Dogg at a $125 million mansion, Fleur de Lys in Los Angeles.

After selling his company Yammer to Microsoft for more than $1 billion, David Sacks threw himself an expensive 40th birthday party with the theme, 'Let Them Eat Cake.'

Everyone was dressed in 18th century attire for the Marie Antoinette-like affair.

Snoop Dogg performed at the event, which was held at a $125 million mansion in Los Angeles, Fleur de Lys.

Broadcom billionaire Henry Nicholas built a man cave for sexcapades, drugs and concerts under his Laguna Beach home with an $18,000 bar, a jacuzzi and more.

'In an Oriental-themed, tricked-out parlor, Nicholas, his friends and a bevy of prostitutes would party and have sex for days - abusing cocaine, laughing gas and other drugs, as music from such chart-toppers as Led Zeppelin and Phil Collins played, according to court papers and a former employee,' the New York Post wrote.

The cave had a six-person jacuzzi and an $18,000 bar.

Google CEO Larry Page spent $45 million on a super yacht.

Larry Page, CEO and co-founder of Google, spent $45 million on a mega 193-foot yacht with 10 suites, a helipad and a gym.

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt also has a yacht, one that is bigger than Page's and cost him $72.3 million.

Eric Schmidt's yacht is even bigger than Larry Page's. It's 195 feet and cost him $72.5 million.

He's also invested heavily in ocean studies, putting some $60 million towards it. The $60 million includes two more ships.

Four 20-something founders of startup group Summit Series bought a $40 million mountain in Utah for parties and events.

Elliot Bisnow, Brett Leve, Jeff Rosenthal and Jeremy Schwartz recently purchased a mountain in Eden, Utah, for $40 million. The mountain will host events and parties for the startup community.

The $40 million doesn't cover the cost of building on the mountain, just the mountain itself. They've already built a few structures, including a giant, human-size bird's nest in a tree.

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