10 ways your work desk has changed in the last 25 years

Every time business has gone somewhere new, discovered something different, or done something revolutionary, chances are, ThinkPad was there. Because it’s not a laptop. It’s a ThinkPad.
Now celebrating 25 years of ThinkPad.
Photo: iStock.

Do you remember your first desk? If you started working in an office in the 1990s, chances are your current desk looks absolutely nothing like it.

You can no longer hear the dulcet “egh-urgh-rah” tones of the dial-up internet connection, and you’re probably not working in a constant cloud of cigarette smoke while you bash away on a separate handheld calculator.

I asked the Business Insider team how their desks have changed in the last 25 years, and here are the big ones.

1. Desk phones have disappeared in lieu of smartphones

Photo: Getty/Max Whittaker

2. Pretty much everyone has multiple screens


3. Office cubicles turned into open plan which turned into “hot desking”

Work spaces at PwC. Photo: Supplied.

4. It’s now quite common for people to use standing desks

Photo: LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images

5. Windows95 is no longer the latest and greatest operating system

Picture: Wikimedia Commons

6. There are no more piles of books and documents, because everything is online

Scott Garfield/Warner Bros./Getty Images

7. Which means we no longer need paper spikes

Photo: PeopleImages

8. Your old CRT Monitor and CPU tower doesn’t take up most of the desk

Photo: Sephirot17, iStock.

9. The laptop itself has… changed in the last 25 years – so you can actually take it anywhere with you now

The Lenovo-IBM Thinkpad 755C. Photo: Reddit.

10. Our screens are now all touch screens, because who has time to use a mouse?

Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 370. Picture: alemania, Buzz World.

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