10 Things We Learned Today

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  • An Oregon judge issued a restraining order forbidding Google from deleting private data recorded from unsecured wifi networks. Despite facing legal action in three U.S. states and at least one foreign country, Google has largely avoided much public outcry. That’s as it should be, since this doesn’t appear very serious on the merits, but its still surprising. Facebook must be furious.
  • Google poached Matias Duarte, Palm’s head of interface. Interface is something Palm actually did well, so this is a blow to HP, which recently bought the company.
  • Wired’s iPad app racked up 24,000 downloads in its first day in the App Store.
  • Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer’s response to Apple passing his company in market cap: we still make the most money.
  • A chorus of interested parties struck back at the Twitter-is-at-war-with-developers meme. The head of Yfrog said Twitter wasn’t planning to build or buy its own image-sharing service anytime soon. Sency’s founder said being a Twitter developer is still great. And VC Mark Suster said he plans to keep investing in Twitter developers.
  • 40% of all iPhones sold this year have been purchased by corporations, AT&T revealed.
  • Andy Lees, the man tasked with getting Microsoft’s mobile act together, isn’t really a product guy, a former employee says. In any case, his job is basically impossible.
  • The lifespan of YouTube videos is in decline. Currently, an average video gets 50% of its views within 6 days of being uploaded.
  • Google’s AdMob acquisition is — finally — official. The company took the opportunity to lay out its vision for the future of the mobile space.
  • Steve Ballmer won’t be speaking at Apple’s developer conference. The rumour that he would only came to our attention today, so we aren’t actually any more informed than we were yesterday, but we are much sadder.

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