10 things in tech you need to know today

Mark ZuckerbergDavid Ramos/Getty Images30-year old co-founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg.

Good morning! Here’s the tech news you need to know today.

1. Facebook stock was down 2% after its Q1 earnings. It brought in $US3.54 billion in revenue (with $US3.56 expected) and EPS were $US0.42, higher than the expected figure of $US0.40.

2. EBay reported a 4.4% rise in revenue, helped by businesses including PayPal. Shares were up 4.5% in after hours trading.

3. Google announced its new wireless phone service Project Fi. Customers only have to pay for the data that they actually use.

4. Facebook launched its new dialler app, Hello. It uses your Facebook contacts to see who’s calling you.

5. AT&T shares were up 2% after beating earning estimates for Q1. Revenue was $US32.58 billion, versus an expected $US32.84 billion.

6. The world’s first head transplant may actually be a hoax designed to promote a video game. People have spotted similarities between the doctor planning the surgery and a character from an upcoming video game.

7. Apple is starting to ship the first Apple Watch orders. And some people who had previously had their orders delayed are now seeing that they’re shipping on time.

8. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff got a 25% salary bump last year. He now earns $US39 million thanks to option awards.

9. Path is in talks to sell its main app to a South Korean company. It’s moving towards developing other apps.

10. Users of the Mt. Gox Bitcoin exchange can now file a claim to get some of their money back. The service suspended trading in 2014 after millions of pounds worth of bitcoin went missing.

NOW WATCH: 5 hard-to-find iPhone tricks only power users know about

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.