10 Things In Tech You Need To Know This Morning

Android one 2

GoogleAndroid One.

Good morning! It’s another gloomy but mild day here in London. Here’s what you need to know right now:

1. Google has signed Karbonn, another Indian phone maker, to its Android One project. The push is designed to bring high-end “pure” Android phones to 500 million people.

2. “The Interview” will not be released, Sony says. The hackers have won, basically.

3. The US thinks North Korea did the hack on Sony. The hackers routed their attack through the same Bolivian servers that had been used for an attack on North Korea in 2012.

4. Here is the trailer for “The Interview. It’s the movie about North Korea that triggered the Sony hack.

5. Multi-millionaire Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel said he wanted to cry when he realised his emails had been leaked in the Sony hack. He needed a hug, and got one.

6. Google faces an antitrust lawsuit over Android. At issue: Whether Android uses its dominance to discriminate against competing search engines like Bing.

7. Silicon Valley billionaire Vinod Khosla does not want you on his beach. His lawyers filed to reverse a court order that gave access to the California beach that sits in front of his property. Khosla has blocked off the beach since 2008.

8. Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer refused to hire Gwyneth Paltrow. She didn’t have a college degree.

9. Dick Costolo sold a massive amount of Twitter stock. But don’t read anything into that! “Dick has sold shares under a plan filed in the summer and his total sales represent less than 10 per cent of his total equity in Twitter,” Jim Prosser, a spokesman for the company, told Bloomberg.

10. Looks like Apple is ramping up Apple Pay for the UK. The company is hiring in London.

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