10 things in tech you need to know today

Jack MaREUTERS/Lucy NicholsonJack Ma, Executive Chairman of Alibaba

Good morning! Here’s the tech news you need to know going into the weekend.

1. French taxi drivers rioted in the streets because they are unhappy about the rise of Uber in the country. They blocked roads and threw rocks at cars.

2. Google Ventures has invested in London startup Yieldify. The e-commerce company raised £7.3 million from Google Ventures and Softbank.

3. Google Ventures also announced that it was leading a round of funding in London-based children’s book publisher Lost My Name. The company lets parents create personalised books.

4. Apple’s latest software update includes hints about future hardware products. Code suggests that the company is working on a 4K iMac and a new Bluetooth remote control.

5. Alibaba CEO Jack Ma has spent $US23 million on a giant park in America. He plans to use it as a vacation home.

6. IAC/InterActive is going to spin out its online dating unit. That means that Match.com and Tinder will be a separate, publicly traded company.

7. Rohan Silva is buying the Serpentine Pavilion and shipping it to LA. David Cameron’s former technology advisor is going to use it as an events venue.

8. Eminem will be the first person interviewed on Apple’s new online radio station. Beats 1 launches on Tuesday.

9. Taylor Swift has decided to put her hit album “1989” on Apple Music. The star had been deliberating about the decision, since she doesn’t trust music streaming.

10. Apple is pulling games that use the confederate flag from the App Store. Games about the civil war are being removed.

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