10 things in tech you need to know today

Sergey Brin and Larry PageGetty Images NewsGoogle cofounders Sergey Brin and Larry Page.

Good morning! Here’s the tech news you need to know today.

1. The UK government has seemingly reversed its position on encryption and now says it’s not trying to ban it. A government spokesperson told us that David Cameron isn’t going to ban apps like WhatsApp and Snapchat.

2. NASA visited Pluto for the first time. We also have incredible new photos of the planet.

3. Twitter shares spiked yesterday after a fake Bloomberg story claimed the site was being sold for $US31 billion. The story was an elaborate fake.

4. Barclays now says it will support Apple Pay. The service launched in the UK yesterday.

5. Dating site Plenty of Fish has been acquired by the Match group. The bootstrapped app is now part of the same company as Tinder and OkCupid.

6. Google stock was up yesterday after a report claimed that the company has recently slowed down on hiring and spending. Stock rose over 3% on the news.

7. British private jet startup Victor has raised $US5 million in new funding. It also acquired US competitor YoungJets.

8. Documentary maker Laura Poitras is suing the US government because she keeps getting stopped at airports. Poitras created the documentary “Citizenfour” about Edward Snowden.

9. Twitter cofounder Evan Williams wants developers back on the platform. He said that winding down the site’s API was a mistake.

10. The new “Metal Gear Solid” game doesn’t have its famous creator’s name on the box. Hideo Kojima is usually featured prominently, but he has reportedly fallen out with publisher Konami.

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