10 things in tech you need to know today

Good morning! Here’s the tech news you need to know this morning.

1. Twitter is making CEO Jack Dorsey its next product chief. On Saturday, four executives left the company, including head of product Kevin Weil.

2. Backlash is growing against Google’s UK tax deal. The FT reports that Downing Street has distanced itself from the agreement.

3. Microsoft is changing how it invests in startups and has a new leader to help. Microsoft Ventures is bringing on Nagraj Kashyap, the former head of Qualcomm Ventures.

4. Amazon Prime is growing like crazy. It has 54 million members, up 34% from last year, according to a new estimate.

5. Twitter has reportedly stopped showing adverts to its most valuable users. Re/code reports the social network is ditching ads for its VIP users to ensure they stay engaged.

6. Amazon is reportedly trying to push Google out of Android phones. The company has allegedly been in talks with smartphone manufacturers about getting its services integrated into phones at a “factory” level.

7. Spotify is rolling out video to users this week. The music streaming service is gearing up to launch its video offering.

8. 200 Wikipedia editors are demanding the resignation of a Wikimedia Foundation board of directors member over his involvement in a “no poach” agreement between Apple and Google. The vote is not legally binding, as Ars Technica reports.

9. Donald Rumsfeld has made an app. The former US Secretary of Defence has created iPhone game “Churchill Solitaire.”

10. Snapchat is working a big update to take on Facebook Messenger. The ephemeral photo messaging app is improving its video and audio calling, as well as introducing stickers.

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