10 things in tech you need to know today

Apple CEO Tim CookAP Photo/Marcio Jose SanchezApple CEO Tim Cook introduces Apple Watch last October.

Good morning! It’s a pretty foggy start to the day in London. Here’s the tech news you need to know today.

1. The first reviews of the Apple Watch have been published. It’s a nice device, they say, but it’s not for everyone.

2. Zynga founder Mark Pincus is returning as the company’s CEO. The company’s stock was down over 10% after the news was announced.

3. Samsung is expecting record shipments for the new Samsung Galaxy S6. The phone goes on sale on Friday.

4. Apple has acquired a finger-tracking app called “Dryft.” It tracks whether your fingers are resting on your keyboard or actively typing.

5. Facebook has launched a standalone web version of Facebook Messenger. It lets people talk to their friends on a site without the clutter of Facebook.

6. Disney is pushing Apple to include more of its channels on Apple’s upcoming TV streaming service. But Apple wants to include fewer channels so that it can charge a lower price.

7. Microsoft is working on a big update to Windows 10 called Redstone. The update is going to include functionality for new devices.

8. SpaceX is going to attempt to land a rocket on a platform on April 13. It tried it once before, and it resulted in an explosion.

9. Google is secretly developing a conference call app called GMeet. Code found online hints that it has existed since at least 2011.

10. Piracy app Popcorn Time, which lets people illegally watch movies online, has found a way to sneak an app onto the iPhone. But Apple will likely try to shut it down.

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