10 things you need to know before European markets open

Good morning! Here’s what you need to know.

Marmite is back on the shelves of Britain’s biggest retailer. Tesco confirmed that a pricing row with Unilever had been settled, confirming a statement issued by the Anglo-Dutch consumer goods giant.

The European Union is appealing against a WTO decision. The EU launched an appeal against a World Trade Organisation panel finding last month that it had failed to rein in billions of dollars in subsidies to planemaker Airbus.

China is easing rules for companies like Uber. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has signalled a potential easing of strict regulations for the country’s fast-growing car-hailing market, the official People’s Daily said, a week after several major cities tightened rules on the sector.

Russia blames the US for cooling relations. The Russian Foreign Ministry said that the Obama administration was continuing to destroy relations with Moscow in the run-up to the US presidential election next month.

The Fed could raise in December. The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits held at a 43-year low last week, pointing to sustained labour market strength that could pave the way for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates in December.

Russia is selling oil assets. Igor Sechin, the chief executive of Russia’s top oil producer Rosneft, said he was confident the sale of a minority stake in the company would happen by the end of this year.

Amazon is hiring tens of thousands of people. The company said it would hire more than 120,000 seasonal employees across its fulfillment centres, sortation centres and customer service sites in the United States in the upcoming holiday season.

Goldman Sachs started a retail lending business. The bank has launched a new online lending business that targets borrowers saddled with credit-card debt, the bank said.

Deutsche Bank has introduced a hiring freeze. The bank seeks to cut costs amid a deep strategic overhaul. Germany’s flagship lender sent a memo to managers on the hiring freeze, which excludes the compliance department.

Boris Johnson tempered the UK’s anti-immigrant rhetoric. Britain’s post-Brexit goal of lower immigration and tighter border controls does not mean that it will have to close its doors to skilled workers from around the world, foreign minister Boris Johnson said.

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