The 10 most important things in the world right now

1.
The US and 12 countries on the Pacific Rim finally agreed on the
Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which will reduce tariffs on hundreds of imported items, like pork and beef in Japan and pickup trucks in the US.

2. Two Air France executives had their shirts ripped off their backs by angry workers who barged into a meeting at the company’s headquarters to protest plans to cut over 2,800 jobs.

3. Turkey asked the European Union to create a safe zone from terrorism and a no-fly zone in Syria to help combat the migrant crisis.

4. An American Airlines flight en route from Phoenix to Boston had to make an emergency landing after the pilot died mid-flight.

5. A Russian warplane violated Turkish airspace near the Syrian border, which a US defence official believes was not an accident.

6. Facebook is
partnering with satellite company Eutelsat to beam internet around the world.

7. British energy giant BP will pay a record $US20.8 billion to settle civil claims for damages stemming from the deadly 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

8. DuPont’s chief executive Ellen Kullman, who has been CEO since 2009, is retiring after admitting the company’s stock price was a “concern.”

9. General Mills is recalling 1.8 million boxes of Cheerios cereal because they contain wheat, but are labelled as gluten-free.

10. Jack Dorsey will be staying on as Twitter’s full-time CEO after being named interim CEO when Dick Costolo stepped down in July.

And finally…

China is building the world’s largest radio telescope to detect signs of life billions of light years away.

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