1 in 3 Aussies secretly check their partner's phone -- here's what that says about your relationship

Smartphone users in Sydney. Image: Getty

Have you ever thought of snooping on your partner’s phone while it’s unattended?

There are more people that do this than you might think, but if you’re tempted by the thought then you may have some issues, says a relationship expert.

A survey conducted by Tech21 has found one in three Australians have checked their partners’ phones without their knowledge. This behaviour raises alarm bells for Relationships Australia couples and family therapist Matt Garrett.

“If this is happening in a relationship then it’s a dead sign that things aren’t going well,” Garrett told Business Insider. “And if you can’t sort it out, get some help.”

Spying on your partner maybe an indication of festering trust issues that need to be resolved for the long-term health of the relationship, according to Garrett.

“It’s like any trust issue, you have to put it out there on the table. However, reading someone’s text messages — unless the partner has discovered them doing it — it’s unlikely the issue will be raised in a temperate or moderate way. It can come out as a bit of a weapon.”

Monitoring a partner’s phone records is just one way a trust problem can manifest itself. Garrett cited “being overly inquisitive” and stalking as two other warning signs that the couple needs help.

“It really involves very complex and destructive emotions. So [counsellors] would start very gingerly to unpack where the trust issues come from and what they’re about.”

Your partner isn’t the only one to be paranoid about. The Tech21 survey of 2003 Australians also found 37% of millennials admitted to hijacking a friend’s device to update their social media status.

Tech21 is a British company that manufactures protective cases for smartphones.

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