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Walmart Protesters Crashed Marissa Mayer's Keynote Session At Dreamforce Today

A small group of women interrupted Marissa Mayer’s crowded conference session at Dreamforce this afternoon in protest of worker conditions at Walmart.

Mayer was minutes into an on-stage conversation with Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff when protesters approached the stage from the back of the auditorium, chanting: “Walmart protest, revolution.”

The protest lasted under a minute, sparking confusion among the tens of thousands of people who had waited more than 30 minutes for Mayer to appear on stage.

Protesters were escorted out of the Moscone Centre; Benioff said he would dispatch Salesforce’s legal team with them but neither executive explained the interruption, choosing instead to move on to discuss Yahoo product design.

Benioff, who orchestrated a few guerrilla marketing stunts at competitors’ conferences during Salesforce’s early days, noted:

“We don’t want any more protests … but if you want to protest, No. 1, you can do it outside.

No. 2, it’s better to split up when you start. Then when those people get arrested, then a second group stands up. Then a third … I’m just saying.”

Protesters were heard arguing loudly with Salesforce staff outside of the conference hall shortly afterwards.

Marissa Mayer is a director of Walmart, which has made headlines in recent months for reportedly paying nearly two-thirds of its workers less than $US25,000 a year.

One Walmart store in Ohio is reportedly holding a charity drive for staff who are otherwise unable to afford enough food for Thanksgiving.

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