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REPORT: US Officials Believe The Missing Malaysian Airlines Jet Flew Towards The Indian Ocean West Of Perth

There are now two corridors where the missing Malaysian Airlines plane will likely be found: one is to the north heading towards the Kazakhstan and the other is off Western Australia.

Bloomberg reports, citing two US officials, that investigators are growing more convinced that the jetliner’s most likely last-known position was around 1,000 nautical miles west of Perth in the India Ocean.

However, experts said there’s a good chance MH370 will never be found if it’s gone into a deep and remote part of the Indian Ocean.

Australia today took charge of the search in the Indian Ocean.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott told Parliament Australia would co-ordinate operations in the vast search area to its west.

Mr Abbott spoke to Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak today. “I offered the Malaysian Prime Minister additional maritime surveillance resources which he gratefully accepted.”

Defence Force chief General David Hurley had been in touch with his Malaysian counterpart to discuss how additional resources could be used.

Australia has two P-3 Orion surveillance planes on the search and are reported to be looking around the The Cocos islands about 2,000 nautical miles northwest of Perth.

Mr Abbott said: “We will do our duty to ensure that our search and rescue responsibilities are maintained and upheld and we will do our duty to the families of the 230 people on that aircraft who are still absolutely devastated by their absence and who are still profoundly, profoundly saddened by this as yet unfathomed mystery.”

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