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U.S. Appeals Court Revives An Apple Patent Lawsuit Against Google

A Google logo is seen at the garage where the company was founded on Google's 15th anniversary in Menlo Park, California September 26, 2013. REUTERS/Stephen LamA Google logo is seen at the garage where the company was founded on Google’s 15th anniversary in Menlo Park, California

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. appeals court on Friday revived patent claims Apple made against Google subsidiary Motorola Mobility over mobile phone technology that had been dismissed by an Illinois court.

It also revived a patent claim that Motorola Mobility had made against Apple but ruled Motorola could not seek a sales ban for infringement of the patent, which is essential to a standard.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit had been hearing two cases – one in which Apple accused Motorola Mobility, which was later bought by Google, of infringing four patents. Motorola accused Apple of infringing a standard essential patent, one necessary to making a mobile phone work.

The cases were consolidated at the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. Judge Richard Posner, who took the case, dismissed it in 2012 before trial, saying that neither company had sufficient evidence to prove their case.

(Reporting by Diane Bartz and Dan Levine)

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This post originally appeared at Reuters. Copyright 2014. Follow Reuters on Twitter.

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