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Qantas is buying 8 Boeing 787 Dreamliners

The Qantas Dreamliner, the Boeing 787-92. Photo: Qantas News Room.

Qantas will add a total of eight Boeing 787 Dreamliners, widely considered the world’s most advanced and efficient passenger jets, from 2017.

Unveiling a full-year underlying profit of $975 million today, the airline also announced its intention to purchase the new aircraft, which will replace five of its older Boeing 747s.

The Boeing 787-9s are slightly longer and have a better range than the 787-8s. They have a range of just over 14,000km.

The passenger cabins feature extra-large, dimmable windows and Boeing claims new counter-turbulence technology delivers smoother flight.

“This milestone acquisition marks the scale of our turnaround and looks ahead to a new era for our iconic international airline,” Qantas CEO Joyce said.

“We have looked closely at every aspect of the Dreamliner and it’s the right aircraft for Qantas’ future.

“The key reason we chose this particular aircraft is its incredible efficiency. Its new technology will reduce fuel burn, cut heavy maintenance requirements and open up new destinations around the globe.

“Because the 787 is smaller than the jumbos it will gradually replace, it gives us the flexibility of having more aircraft without significantly changing our overall capacity.

“Every Qantas aircraft is a symbol of Australia and these aircraft will represent Australian excellence and ambition on a global scale.”

Qantas issued this map showing the range of the Dreamliner from Australian cities:

The airline said it had also secured 15 further options and 30 purchase rights for additional B787s in the future.

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