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More suspected debris from MH370 may have been found on a beach in Mozambique

Photo: Greg Wood – Pool/Getty Images.

Another suspected piece of MH370 may have been found on a beach in Mozambique.

The Associated Press reports that South African teenager Liam Lotter came across the debris in December during a holiday in the southern African nation near the resort town of Xai Xai.

The suspected part from the wing of the missing Malaysian Airlines plane was a metre long and had the number 676EB stamped on it.

“We picked it up and I turned it around and it had like a curve to it. You could see where it’d been pop-riveted almost, like there’s holes on the side,” Lotter told South Africa’s East Coast Radio.

He later brought the fragment back to South Africa despite it being dismissed as a “piece of rubbish” by his family.

The family contacted authorities after it was reported that another suspected piece of MH370 may have also been found on a beach in Mozambique earlier this month.

The South African Civil Aviation Authority has since confirmed that the debris will be sent to Australia for testing where the earlier find in Mozambique is also being examined by officials to see if it belongs to the MH370 aircraft.

“The South African Civil Aviation Authority has arranged for the collection of the part, which will then be sent to Australia as this is the country appointed by Malaysia to identify any parts found,” said spokesman Kabelo Ledwaba in a statement.

The Boeing 777 plane had been flying from Kualar Lumpur to Beijing when it disappeared with 239 people on board two years ago.

Since then, the search for the missing aircraft has focused on the southern Indian Ocean with the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) having covered around 85,000 of the 120,000 square kilometre of the search area.

So far, only aircraft debris found on Reunion Island in July last year has been definitively confirmed as coming from MH370.

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