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MAPS: Tesla expands its Australian charging network

In its first year selling in Australia, Tesla sold more than 600 cars — almost all the standard Model S.

To combat the “range anxiety” that comes with owning a Tesla – the term for drivers worrying about getting from A to B without running out of battery power – the company is also building a Supercharger network to allow customers to travel the east coast and keep their vehicles juiced up, free of charge.

At the Supercharging stations, you simply plug in your car and grab a bite to eat for 40 minutes while another 400-500kms are added to your range.

Right now there are seven Superchargers in Australia connecting Sydney to Melbourne, with stops in Goulburn and Albury-Wodonga featured.

Throughout 2016, Tesla will be adding five more sites up the east coast to connect Sydney to Brisbane. There are no immediate plans for the west coast.

Outside of Tesla’s own Superchargers there are dozens of destination chargers scattered across the country at various hotels and carparks, such as Secure Carparks in Sydney, Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart and an AirBnB hotel in NSW country town of Forbes.

Grey chargers are destination chargers, red ones are Superchargers.

These won’t be able to get your Tesla back on the road in 30 minutes, but if you’re staying somewhere overnight or for a few hours through the day they will juice it right up.

Tesla originally had a few more sites in New South Wales and Queensland that it has since abandoned.

Once more plug-in electric cars enter the Australian market, it will be interesting to see what happens with the infrastructure and whether Tesla will partner with any competing brands or energy companies.

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