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Lance Armstrong questioned whether the Tour de France leader and his Aussie teammate were 'too strong to be clean'

Lance Armstrong questions Chris Froome doping or cleanAP Photo/Christophe Ena

Disgraced global sports icon Lance Armstrong took to Twitter on Tuesday to question whether the leader of the Tour de France, Chris Froome, his teammate Richie Porte, and their team, Sky, are “too strong to be clean.”

Here’s Armstrong’s tweet:


Lance Armstrong tweets question about Chris Froome dopingTwitter

Earlier on Tuesday, Froome, Porte, and Sky destroyed Froome’s Tour rivals on the first summit finish of the race.

As a select group of favourites climbed to the finish at La Pierre-Saint-Martin, Froome attacked on the steep gradient and no one could keep pace.

With his dominating performance he extended his lead in the world’s premier bicycle race and put his stamp on the three-week event as the strongest man in the race and clear favourite to win in Paris on July 26, even though there are several tough mountain stages to go.

One Twitter user replied to Armstrong’s tweet:

To which Armstrong shot back:

Also on Tuesday, the BBC reported that Froome’s computer files with his performance data had been hacked.

“Team Sky believe their computers have been hacked by critics convinced Tour de France leader Chris Froome is using performance-enhancing drugs,” the BBC said.

“Froome has been subjected to sustained scrutiny since his Tour win in 2013, with some sceptics using power data to justify their case against him.

“The 30-year-old Briton has always insisted he is a clean rider.”

Before the US Anti-Doping Agency found that his team ran “the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen,” Armstrong won the Tour seven times, and he did so consecutively from 1999 to 2005. His victories were aided by a variety of performance-enhancing drugs.

Armstrong is facing a $US100 million lawsuit from a former teammate, Floyd Landis, which could bring him financial ruin.

Related to that lawsuit, USA Today reported Tuesday that the “federal government has received the green light to ask additional questions about Lance Armstrong’s sex life” and “to confirm or clarify the nature of his personal relationship with former business associate Stephanie McIlvain, a key witness in the Armstrong doping scandal.”

Armstrong is returning to the Tour this week to ride his bike for charity.

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