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31 people dead as plane strikes bridge, plunges in to river in Taiwan

Image: Twitter.

31 people have died after a plane with 58 passengers aboard plunged into a river in Taiwan’s capital Taipei after hitting a bridge followed a yet inexplicable fall from the sky.

Some 15 survivors have been pulled from the wreckage, while at least another 12 remain unaccounted for, according to Taiwanese officials.

Taipei City government spokesman Sidney Lin told Focus Taiwan news channel the TransAsia Airways plane crashed into the Keelung River.

The ATR 72-600 turboprop had just taken off from Taipei Songshan Airport and was headed to Kinmen Airport.

The whole incident was captured on a car’s dashcam video.

There are reports the plane also clipped a taxi before crashing into the river.

Taiwan’s Central News Agency reported 58 people were onboard the domestic flight.

Local media reported flight controllers lost contact with the plane at around 10.55 local time, just minutes after takeoff.

The BBC reported there were 53 passengers onboard, including 31 tourists from mainland China, and five crew.

On Wednesday afternoon rescue crews in inflatable boats were trying to assist those trapped aboard the partially submerged plane.

This is the second TransAsia Airways plane to crash in a year. In July one of the airline’s aircraft crashed near Taiwan’s Penghu archipelago killing 48 of the 58 people onboard.

Here are some photos of the crash site where authorities and emergency services were working to free trapped passengers.

Photo: Ashley Pon/Getty Images
Photo: Ashley Pon/Getty Images
Photo: Ashley Pon/Getty Images
Photo: Ashley Pon/Getty Images

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