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Here's who's behind the Australian app that wants to be bigger than Snapchat

Bomb’d is aimed squarely at young people.

Yesterday we wrote about Bomb’d, the Australian social media start-up that wants to take on Snapchat.

The service claims to have signed up over 11,000 users in its initial 3 week launch phase, 3000 more than Snapchat had during the same time frame.

The idea is that it’s an “on demand” social media network where, rather than waiting for someone to post something, you send a “bomb” to a friend with a 3-hour expiry to trigger. When the “bomb” is triggered by the person receiving it, their camera counts down from 7 and automatically takes a picture sent back to the “bomber”.

However, one odd thing about the startup is that the founders have been trying to hide their identities as well as their investors.

But we can reveal that the duo behind Bomb’d is Jayson Hornibrook and Markie Bryant, while their main backer is Jamie Olsen of CMB Capital who is also a director. CMB Capital actually lists the company under its portfolio on its website.

Hornibrook and Bryant also run Peazie, an online marketing agency that “combines an intuitive campaign builder with clever conversion and viral mechanics, user generated content moderation, analytics and testing functionality, that ultimately helps brands, agencies and publishers deliver more successful campaigns at scale.” Matt Berriman, the founder of Unlockd, was also an advisor for Peazie in 2012 but as since left the startup.

Olsen’s CMB Capital has also invested the likes of VMob, MediRecords, and Dimmi which was sold to TripAdvisor in 2015.

Correction: An earlier version of this story stated Matt Berriman was still involved with Peazie, when he actually stopped working with the startup in 2012.

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