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Here's how this app is making wallets and queues redundant

Never queue again. Kansas City Shuffle in Sydney using Hey You/ Facebook.

Hey You, the new lovechild of Posse, Beat the Q and E-Coffee Card, is growing and fast.

It’s an app, linked to your credit card, that can allow you to find new restaurants, order coffee, food and even get it delivered, without having to wait in a line or pull out your wallet.

Since the three businesses came together under one app six months ago, Hey You has grown 400% to 65,000 transactions a week — that translates as one coffee ordered every second between the hours of 8-10am every weekday morning.

Originally the “Hey You” rebranding in August was seen as a risky move, but according to co-founder Rebekah Campbell the decision has paid off.

“It was obviously a challenge, but it was incredibly well received,” she said.

“Our fears were probably unnecessary because the day we launched the brand was our highest sell date ever, and then its grown since then.”

The convergence of the businesses has also allowed Hey You to explore partnerships it would not have had the capabilities to do as individual ventures.

In September Hey You signed a partnership deal with Westpac, becoming the first business to integrate the bank’s app.

In the same month it teamed up with Uber, enabling customers to order an Uber service directly through its own platform in the same way.

Now, Hey You is serving the VIP area of the Australian Open, allowing spectators to order food and drink from their seat, not only saving them waiting times in queues but meaning they never have to leave their seat.

Hey You app/ Instagram.

All this is just the start, says Campbell.

Along with developing its own services, possibly bringing on other partners, and testing ways it can start to deliver products, Hey You is also trialing the app in pubs.

This means ordering your beer from your seat. And even better, no lines at the bar — genius.

“At a pub you sit in the beer garden and someone has to go and stand in a line for 20 minutes to order food and drink, get a buzzer and come back to the table. So we have started enabling ordering from tables in pubs, so you can sit at the table, order what you want and get a message on your phone when it’s ready.”

The first pub this has been trialed in is The Exchange in Balmain, Sydney, with many more coming soon across Sydney and Melbourne.

This evolution of app has always been the goal for Campbell who says the vision was to create a holistic app that would dominate a segmented market.

“People really only want to have one app to find great places, to look at the menus, order, pay, get your loyalty, perhaps give feedback, access promotions and get stuff delivered,” Campbell said. “People want that app to provide a great experience and work everywhere.

“We realised someone was going to own that market at some stage, so we thought we may as well have a crack at doing it because we already had three businesses doing different types of the experience… a lot of customers, and a lot of merchants.”

And it’s not just the consumer who is reaping the benefits. Merchants using the app can now run their business through the Hey You system.

“The merchants see us as a tool to run their business. The merchants can see who their customers are, they can contact their customers, they can run promotions, clear stock, get data insight,” she said.

The tool also empowers smaller businesses to compete with giants of retail market.

“Woolworths and Coles have access to an incredible data set of what people are ordering, what products are trending, what they should be charging for different product, while the little guys have no access to anything like that. But because we have a network we can give the little coffee shop owner these tools…which is really valuable to be competitive.”

Now that the app has coffee, lunch, banking and transport covered, Campbell says the focus will be moving from everyday functions to big events such as sporting and music events.

Overall what she is most excited about in the next couple of years is the growth of walletless living.

“Tap and go has been a pretty nice experience in the interim but people don’t actually want to carry a wallet. They just want to carry their phone,” she said.

“We’re becoming a mobile payment society, whether that be paying at the till or paying away from the till.

“The feeling when you use Uber is awesome. Imagine having that kind of experience with everything you do.”

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