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Foxtel and Village Roadshow have officially begun legal proceedings to block pirating sites

Image: HBO

Both Foxtel and Village Roadshow were in court today, launching legal action to block pirating websites in Australia.

The two content giants are separately looking to take advantage of website blocking legislation passed last year to restrict Australian access to pirating sites SolarMovie, The Pirate Bay, Torrenthounds, Torrentz and IsoHunt, claiming they exist solely to enable copyright infringement.

Representatives from all four of Australia’s major internet providers, Telstra, Optus, TPG and M2 also appeared before the Federal Court, and did not present any defence to having the sites blocked.

ITNews is reporting that outside of obtaining the court orders, negotiations are taking place on how best to implement a block.

Both content owners and ISPs say they expect to agree on the majority of issues, but how a website will be blocked technically still remains an issue.

Internet providers say they want to block sites at a domain name system (DNS) level, which is essentially just the URL address. Content providers want both the URL and IP address blocked, which would make it a harder for pirates to circumvent.

ISPs are against this proposal because they believe it could lead to other sites unnecessarily being blocked due to the nature of changing IP addresses.

“We wish to seek to negotiate an arrangement for DNS blocking. If [Foxtel] were pushing for a broader blocking mechanism that might be an issue,” TPG counsel said.

“One example is, if one looks at the first IP address listed for The Pirate Bay, when I visited the address… it’s no longer associated with The Pirate Bay website. IP addresses change very rapidly.”

There’s more over at ITNews.

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