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Everyone's waiting to see if Rumblr, the 'Tinder for fighting' app, is real

Surprised it has taken so long. Pic: 20th Century Fox

Tens of thousands of wannabe Tyler Durdens are hoping a new app which allows them to swipe right and hook up for a fight is real.

We’ll know for sure in less than 24 hours. The makers of “Rumblr” promise the beta for the fighting app will be launched on November 9 at 5pm EST (November 10, 9am AEDT).

Beta invites were being sent out to the first 2000 to sign for it, but you’re way too late – the latest update has 78,000 people signing on for an organised rumble with a stranger.

Here’s what they’ve been promised:

Rumblr is an app for recreational fighters to find, meet, and fight other brawl enthusiasts nearby.

And there’s something for the non-fighters, too:

You don’t need to fight to use Rumblr. With Rumblr Explore, anyone can browse and attend fights close by that other Rumblr users have arranged – all for free!

Here’s how it hopes to work:

Note the slider? You can organise female-only and group fights:

So, is it real?

Whoever’s behind it is no doubt getting inundated with that question:


The New York Daily News managed to get a reply from the creators and they claim they’re virtually home, even pulling funding:

“We have raised relatively substantial funding from private American investors and the app is fully developed.”

There’s a bunch of Instagram posts on the app’s page, but no sign of the actual account. This one sums it up pretty well:

And even if it is real, the app itself is listed on the site as pending approval. There’s going to be tidal wave of negative publicity to wade through before it gets past that stage.

Redditors are having a field day waiting for it. There’s some discussion about its legality and incredibly, it seems there’s a loophole in some states of the US.

Here’s an excerpt from Seattle’s Municipal Code which deals with “Mutual Combat”:

It’s the same ruling that allows vigilantes such as “Phoenix Jones” film himself knocking out ne’er-do-wells at night and posting the vids on YouTube:

So it’s not impossible.

We’ll know tomorrow at 9am Sydney time, but even if it turns out to be true, you already know the first rule.

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