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Desperate Korean Families Move Into Tents Inside Their Homes To Beat The Cold

korean tent

Photo: NHK World

South Korea is currently facing its worst cold spell in years, and it has triggered a power crisis across the country.This has led to massive blackouts and surging energy costs.

Unfortunately, not everyone in Korea can afford to keep themselves warm, reports NHK World.

According to a new report from NHK, some families are now moving into tents within their homes to save on heating costs.

NHK visited the family of Mrs. Kyeung-Soon Lee.

Mrs. Lee lives in an apartment with her family just outside of Seoul.

In her living room is a tent designed specifically for indoor use.

And inside the tent is Mrs. Lee's family.

Lee's condo has drafty rooms despite efforts to keep the cold out. They already tape the windows shut.

The living room temperature is a nippy 18 degrees Celsius (65 degrees Fahrenheit).

But it's 26 degrees Celsius (79 degree Fahrenheit) inside the tent.

Lee heard about the tent from her neighbour.

Thanks to the tent, the Lee family has managed to cut their heating bill in half.

And now the children no longer sleep in their beds. They sleep in the tent.

Sales of products like heating pads, heating panels and foot warmers are up 60 per cent in just the last month.

The very best selling products at Korea's department stores are those that cut power use.

The popular indoor tents are made in this building.

The company reports that demand is far outpacing the supply.

The average temperature these days is around -10 degrees Celsius (14 degrees Fahrenheit) during the day.

However, Mrs. Lee rests well knowing she doesn't have to worry about their kids catching a cold.

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