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Australian stocks end 2015 down 2.13%

Paul Kane/Getty Images

The ASX 200 has ended the final session of the year fractionally lower, capping its winning streak at nine and leaving it nursing the first annual decline seen since 2011.

Here’s the final scoreboard for 2015.

  • ASX 200 5295.90 , -24.04 , -0.45%
  • All Ords 5344.60 , -21.85 , -0.41%
  • AUD/USD 0.7299 , 0.0016 , 0.22%

The charts below help explain the year that was for the Australian market, starting with the 2015 daily chart.

For the year the index fell by 2.13% with weakness in energy and materials, along with a flat performance from financials, overshadowing strong performances from utilities, consumer discretionary, healthcare and industrials. We’ve included the All Ordinaries Gold Index in the chart below given it outperformed all those in the ASX 200.

And here’s how the ASX 200 performed over each month in 2015. Early gains were quickly eroded midway through the year as concerns about bank earnings, China’s economy and higher US interest rates in the US weighed on the two largest sectors of the index, financials and materials.

The late rally in December, where the index gained 2.5%, left the Q4 increase at 5.46%.

As the year-on-year chart below reveals, despite the late surge, the index finished with its first annual decline since 2011.

As for what 2016 will bring, history points to the likelihood that stocks will bounce back following 2015’s disappointment.

Only once – in 2010 and 2011 – has the index recorded back-to-back annual falls in the past two decades. While that doesn’t guarantee a gain will ensue, many out there will be hoping history will repeat.

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