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Australian Islamic State fighter Khaled Sharrouf could still be alive

Khaled Sharrouf with his son in one of his social media posts.

Convicted Australian terrorist Khaled Sharrouf is reportedly still alive.

Reports by News Corp say that the Islamic State fighter has made several attempts to contact people in Sydney as well as issuing a death threat over plans by the NSW Crime Commission to seize his house.

Sharrouf, who was a member of the “Terror Nine”, was believed to have been killed earlier in June last year after an American drone strike in Syria struck him and colleague Mohamed Elomar in Syria. Despite claims by Sharrouf’s daughter that he had died in the attack, only Elomar’s body was found.

“I don’t think people shed a tear when the initial reports of his death came through,” deputy leader of the opposition Tanya Plibersek told reporters today.

“I think these most recent reports, if they are in fact true, just show that he’s even more despicable than we thought.”

Reports by Fairfax further suggest Sharrouf could still be alive with the barrister representing Sharrouf’s relatives, Charles Waterstreet, saying that “he’s probably in Iraq and I think he’s immobilised…incapacitated in some way.”

“Someone who was bright enough to fool a judge like Justice Anthony Whealy into a light sentence is not to be underestimated,” he told Fairfax.

In 2005, Sharrouf was arrested for conspiring to commit terrorist attacks in Sydney.

He fled Australia two years ago under the persona of his brother Mostafa. Despite being watchlisted by Australian authorities, he managed to board a flight to Kuala Lumpur before making his way to Syria prompting an urgent review into Australia’s airport security.

In 2014, the Australian terrorist made headlines again after posting a photo of his then 7-year-old son with the severed head of a dead Syrian soldier accompanied by the words: “That’s my boy”.

His wife Tara Nettleton is understood to have died last week in Syria due to health complications relating to appendicitis.

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