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10 ways to avoid being eaten by a shark

Photo: Darren England / Getty Images.

Australia topped the list for the most fatal shark attacks recorded in 2014 with two fatalities and 11 people injured by the animals.

Earlier this month, Japanese surfer Tadashi Nakahara was killed at Ballina on the NSW north coast when a shark attacked him. The beaches were closed for a number of days following the attack with numerous shark sightings.

Beaches off Newcastle were also shut for more than a week last month when a monster great white was spotted lurking off the coast.

In the past 14 years, 26 people have been killed by sharks in Australia.

With shark activity on the rise, shark deterrent tech company Shark Shield has 10 tips to prevent an unwanted encounter with the predators.

  1. Swim, surf, or dive with other people.

    Sharks most often attack lone individuals.

  2. Swim at patrolled beaches if possible.

    Surf lifesavers keep a look out for the predators and alert beach-goers if they see anything.

  3. Don’t wander too far from shore.

    This will isolate you and make it harder for help to get to you.

  4. Stay out the water at night, dawn, or dusk.

    Sharks are most active at these times and are well-equipped to search for prey during times of poor visibility.

  5. Don’t enter the water if you’re bleeding.

    Sharks have an incredible sense of smell and can track down blood to its source.

  6. Don’t wear high-contrast clothing or light-reflecting jewellery.

    Sharks pick up contrast well and reflective objects could look like fish scales.

  7. Avoid areas where animals, human, or fish waste enters the water.

    Sewage attracts bait fish which in turn attracts sharks.

  8. Avoid murky waters, harbour entrances, channels, and steep drop-offs.

    These are where sharks frequently swim.

  9. If fish or turtles start to act frantically, get out of the water.

    They could be behaving erratically because a shark is nearby.

  10. Refrain from excessive splashing, and if you are diving and are approached by a shark, stay as still as possible.

    Unpredictable movements can attract a curious shark.

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